Transitive and intransitive verb: what are they and examples

Transitive verbs are verbs that need a complement to convey information that makes sense. Intransitive verbs are those that do not need a complement, because they already convey the information necessary to make sense.

Examples:

1. Mom, I already made the beds.

If, without my mother asking for anything, I said, “Mom, I already did.”, she would probably ask what that I had done, because the verb to do needs a complement to convey information with sense.

Thus, the verb make is transitive, because the complement “as camas” is essential to complete it.

2. Guys, I'm here!

If I say “Guys, I arrived.”, people will understand that I arrived, because the verb arrive does not need a complement to convey meaningful information.

In this case, the verb is intransitive, because it alone offers understandable information.

THE difference between transitive and intransitive verb is that transitives transit, that is, they go to their complement, as they need it to make sense, while transitives intransitive do not transit, that is, they do not need to go anywhere, because by themselves they already offer the information that We need.

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transitive verbs

Transitive verbs are verbs that need to be accompanied by a complement, as they cannot convey complete information on their own.

Example: I have test tomorrow.

Saying “I have” is too vague. The verb have needs a complement. So if I say, “I have proof,” I am conveying understandable information. In this case, it was essential to complete the verb ter with the complement “proof”.

According to the type of complement, transitive verbs can be:

  • direct transitive verbs
  • indirect transitive verbs
  • direct and indirect transitive verbs

DIRECT transitive verbs are transitive verbs whose complement does not require the presence of a preposition.

Example: I bought the book.

The verb comprar is direct transitive, because the complement “the book” is essential to complete it and, in this complement, there is no preposition.

INDIRECT transitive verbs are transitive verbs whose complement requires the presence of a preposition.

Example: I liked the book.

The verb like is transitive indirect, because the complement “of the book” is essential to complete it and, in this complement, there is the preposition de (de + o = do).

DIRECT AND INDIRECT transitive verbs are transitive verbs that need two complements: one that requires the presence of a preposition and one that does not require the presence of a preposition.

Example: I gave the book to Ana.

The verb dar is transitive, direct and indirect, because there are two essential complements to complete it.

The first complement is “the book”, in which there is no preposition. The second complement is “para a Ana”, in which there is the preposition para.

Examples of transitive verbs

To do: I made pancakes!

To have: I am thirsty.

Purchase: Bought bread?

Like: I liked the movie.

To give: I gave the message to the teacher.

Sell: Did you sell everything?

Wait: I'm waiting for the bus.

To take: I'll take the copies tomorrow.

To belong: The book belongs to the library.

Love: Love my dog.

intransitive verbs

Intransitive verbs are verbs that do not need to be accompanied by a complement, as they can convey complete information on their own.

Example: Mom, I fell.

The verb to fall does not need a complement, as it alone is conveying meaningful information.

But, if I told my mother that I had fallen, surely she would ask where, and the answer could be “Mother, I fell in the street”.

Information “on the street” is accessory (not essential), that is, we do not need it to transmit information. meaningful information, so “on the street” is not a verb complement, and the verb to fall continues to be intransitive.

Examples of intransitive verbs

To arrive: He arrived late.

To fall: The child fell.

Born: The baby was born.

To die: The patient died yesterday.

To cry: Cried a lot.

To sleep: I slept badly.

To live: Live peacefully.

To sit: Sat on the floor.

To marry: I got married in the summer.

To walk: I walked so much!

Read too:

  • transitive verbs
  • intransitive verbs
  • verbal transitivity
  • Verbal transitivity exercises
  • Transitive Verbs
  • Intransitive Verbs
  • verbal transitivity
  • Verbal Predication
  • Verbal transitivity exercises
  • indirect object
  • Verbal Conducting Exercises
  • direct transitive verb
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