Exercises on Present Perfect (easy level)

Correct alternative: c) Have … eaten

Have you eaten caviar? (Have you ever eaten caviar?)

a) WRONG.has until it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. In addition, this alternative is automatically invalidated on account of the subject of the sentence (you). Remember that bending has is only used with third persons singular: he, she and it. Also, the main verb to eat (eat) is flexed in the Simple Past. The formation rule of Present Perfect is as follows: verb I have fflexed in Simple Present (has or have) + Past Participate of the main verb + complement

b) WRONG. have until it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. What makes this alternative incorrect is the use of until, as this is the inflected form of the verb to eat (eat) at Simple Past. At the Present Perfect, the main verb must be inflected in the Past Participate (eaten).

c) CORRECT. Alternative c) correctly applies the formation rule of the Present Perfect: verb I have

flexed in the Simple Present (used the have, because the subject is you) + Past Participate of the main verb (eaten) + complement (caviar).

The question expresses the interlocutor's desire to know if Helen has ever eaten caviar in her life, that is, if throughout her entire existence up to the present moment, Helen has already tasted this delicacy. In this case, the Present Perfect it is indicative of a period of time that lasts from the past to the present moment.

d) WRONG. The sentence is just wrong because of the use of the inflected form has. as the subject of the sentence is you, the correct bending is have. Has is only used with he, she and it.

Correct alternative: a) havent seen

I haven't seen Mary lately. Have you? (I haven't seen Mary lately. You have?)

a) CORRECT. The use of the adverb lately (lately) is an indication of the use of Present Perfect for it expresses the idea that something that started in the past and still remains. The phrase I haven't seen Mary lately indicates that at some point in the past someone stopped seeing Mary and continues without seeing her until the present moment.

b) WRONG. This alternative is incorrect because hasn’t is only used when the subject is the third person singular (he, she and it). In the sentence, the subject is I (me).

c) WRONG.Didn't see is the negative form of Simple Past. This tense is used to indicate actions that have already taken place, that is, that had a beginning and an end in the past.

Note that the use of the adverb lately (ultimately) indicates that the action expressed by the verb has not been completed; although it started in a past moment, it remains until the present moment, that is, the interlocutor has not seen Mary recently and still does not see her.

See how the tense changes the meaning of the sentence:

  • I haven't seen Mary lately. Have you? (I haven't seen Mary lately. Have you seen her?)
  • I didn’t see Mary lately. Have you? (I haven't seen Mary lately. Have you seen?)

The question that continues the sentence also invalidates the use of Simple Past. O Have you? of the sentence is a question tag, that is, a short question used to get a confirmation.

At tag questions they always present the same tense used in the affirmative or negative sentence that comes before it. Soon, if the question tag uses the Present Perfect, the previous sentence should also do it.

d) WRONG.saw is the inflected form of Simple Past verb I see (see), used in affirmative sentences to indicate completed actions, that is, that had a beginning and an end in the past.

The use of the adverb lately (lately) indicates that the action of the sentence is still in progress. Another factor that makes it impossible to use a flexion of Simple Past and the tag question "Have you?", because the tense used in it (Present Perfect) must also be used in the sentence that precedes it.

Correct alternative: c) has traveled

She has traveled to Italy since 2010. (She has been traveling to Italy since 2010.)

a) WRONG.have travel it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. Furthermore, she is third person singular, so the inflection of the verb I have that must accompany her is has.

b) WRONG. has travel it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. In the formation of the PresentPerfect, use the Past Participate of the main verb. Bearing in mind that the main verb is to travel (travel), the flexion of Past Participate é traveled, and not travel.

c) CORRECT. The sentence presents the correct formation of the Present Perfect: subject + auxiliary verb I have flexed in the Simple Present (simple present) + main verb inflected in Past Participate (past participle) + complement

  • subject: she
  • auxiliary verb I have flexed in the Simple Present (simple present): has
  • main verb (to travel) flexed in the Past Participate (past participle): traveled
  • complement: to Italy since 2010.

d) WRONG. how the subject of the sentence is she (third person singular), the correct inflection of the auxiliary verb is has.

Correct alternative: c) has - driven

He has never driven a car before. (He had never driven a car before.)

a) WRONG.has drive it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. In the formation of the PresentPerfect, the flexion of Past Participate of the main verb. Bearing in mind that the main verb is to drive (drive), the bending of Past Participate é driven.

b) WRONG. as the subject of the sentence is he, third person singular, the inflection of the auxiliary verb I have to be used is has. The have flexion is only used when the subject is I, you, we and they.

c) CORRECT. Note that, in this alternative, the formation structure of the Present Perfect is correct: subject + auxiliary verb I have flexed in the Simple Present (simple present) + main verb inflected in Past Participate (past participle) + complement

  • subject: he
  • auxiliary verb I have flexed in the Simple Present (simple present): has
  • main verb (to drive) flexed in the Past Participate (past participle): driven
  • complement: car before

In the sentence, the Present Perfect is used to refer to a life experience emphasized by the use of words never (never is before (before). The interlocutor makes a statement where he says that, throughout his life and up to the moment of speech, the subject had never driven a car.

d) WRONG. when the adverb never (occurs) in the sentence, the verb cannot be used in the negative form; it must be used in the affirmative. Hasn’t is the negative form of the auxiliary verb I have.

Correct alternative: c) have - lived

How long have they lived in Spain? (How long have they lived in Spain?)

a) WRONG.have live it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. The formation rule of Present Perfect requires the use of Past Participate (past participle) of the main verb. Bearing in mind that the main verb of the sentence is I'm live (to live), the flexion of Past Participate é lived.

b) WRONG. has live it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. Note that the subject of the sentence is they (they). Therefore, the correct flexion of the auxiliary I have é have. Has is only used when the subject is the third person singular (he, she or it). Also, in the Present Perfect the main verb must be inflected in the Past Participate (lived).

c) CORRECT. In interrogative form, the formation rule of the Present Perfect follows the following structure: auxiliary verb I have at the Simple Present + subject + main verb in Past Participate (past participle) + complement

  • auxiliary verb I have flexed in the Simple Present (simple present): have, because the subject is they
  • subject: they (they)
  • main verb (I'm live) flexed in the Past Participate (past participle): lived
  • complement: in Spain

O Present Perfect often used withThe (how long) to ask questions about the length of time of actions that started in the past and continue in the present.

d) WRONG. Alternative d) is immediately invalidated because of the use of flexion has, which should only be used when the subject is he, she or it. as the subject of the sentence is they (they), the correct bending of the auxiliary I have é have.

Correct alternative: a) have known

I have known Susan for 10 years. (I've known Susan for 10 years).

a) CORRECT. The formation structure of the affirmative form of the Present Perfect follow the following rule: subject + auxiliary verb I have flexed in the Simple Present (simple present) + main verb inflected in Past Participate (past participle) + complement

  • subject: I
  • auxiliary verb I have flexed in the Simple Present (simple present): have
  • main verb (I know) flexed in the Past Participate (past participle): known
  • complement: Susan for 10 years

O Present Perfect is often used with the word for (there is) to indicate the length of time of an action that started in the past and is still real.

b) WRONG.have know it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. At the Present Perfect, the main verb must be inflected in the Past Participate. Bearing in mind that the main verb is I know (know), the correct flexion of the Past Participate é known.

c) WRONG.ve knew it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. This alternative is incorrect due to the use of the main verb. I know (know) flexed in the Simple Past (knew), when it should be flexed in the Past Participate (known) according to the formation rule of the structure of the Present Perfect: auxiliary verb I have flexed in the Simple Present + main verb inflected in Past Perfect.

d) WRONG. ve know it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. Know is the infinitive form of I know. In the formation of the Present Perfect, the main verb inflected is used in the Past Participate (known).

Correct alternatives: a) She has lost her keys. That’s why she can’t open the door. (She lost her keys. That's why she can't open the door.) and c) I have done a lot of tasks today. (I did a lot of chores today.)

a) CORRECT. In the sentence, the use of Present Perfect indicates that an action started in the past (she has lost her keys - she lost the keys) and which remains and has an impact at the present time, that is, the aforementioned keys have not yet been found.

b) WRONG. The use of last year (last year) requires the tense of the sentence to be the Simple Past, as it indicates an action that had a beginning and an end in the past. So the correct phrase would be We traveled to Japan last year. (We traveled to Japan last year.)

O Present Perfect, in turn, indicates actions that started in the past and have an impact on the present, or actions that started in the past and ended recently.

c) CORRECT. One of the ways to use the Present Perfect indicates that an action was started in the past and that it remains until the present moment. the bending of Present Perfect (have done) + today (today) indicates that the interlocutor started performing tasks at a certain point in the past (in this case, a very recent past, which occurred in the speech day itself), and that such action still remains real, that is, it is related to the present since the day has not yet finished.

d) WRONG. The use of Present Perfect it is not adequate in the sentence, as it indicates an action that had a beginning and an end in the past. In this case, the tense that should have been used is the Simple Past and with that, the correct sentence would be: The Chinese invented printing. (The Chinese invented printing.)

Correct alternative: d) haven’t visited

I havent visited my newborn nephew yet. (I still haven't visited my newborn nephew.)

a) WRONG. This alternative is incorrect because of the word yet; have visited is an inflection of an affirmative sentence and the word yet (still) is only used in negative and interrogative sentences.

b) WRONG. Havent visit it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. In the formation of the Present Perfect, the main verb must be inflected in the Past Participate. So instead of visit, the correct bending is visited.

c) WRONG.have visit it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. Even though the inflection was grammatically correct (have visited rather than have visit)

d) CORRECT. O yet (still) is an adverb used in negative sentences. In sentences with the Present Perfect, it indicates that in a timeline that started in a past moment and extends to the present moment, something hasn't happened, but it can still happen.

Alternative: b) Have - heard

a) WRONG. have hear it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. The formation structure of the interrogative form of the Present Perfect consists of the auxiliary verb I have + main verb inflected in Past Participate.

Bearing in mind that the main verb is I hear (listen), the bending of Past Participate correct is heard and not hear.

b) CORRECT. The formation structure of the Present Perfect requires the use of the auxiliary verb I have flexed in the Simple Present (used have because the subject of the sentence is you) + main verb (I hear) flexed in the Past Participate (heard).

c) WRONG. The use of construction have .. I hear at the beginning of the question is incorrect and non-existent in the English language. When a question is started by an auxiliary verb, such as the verb I have, the main verb (in the sentence, it is the verb I hear) must be used in the infinitive without the I'm: hear

d) WRONG. have...I heard it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. heard is a bending of the Simple Past It's from Past Participate. Inflected verbs are not accompanied by I'm.

Correct alternative: c) has - gone

A: "What time will Daniel go to school?"
B: "He has already gone"

(A: "What time does Daniel go to school?"
B: "He's already gone.")

a) WRONG. has already go it is an incorrect and non-existent construction in the English language. In the formation of the Present Perfect, the main verb inflected is used in the Past Participate.

b) WRONG. went is an inflection of the affirmative form of the Simple Past and, for this reason, it should not be used with any auxiliary verb. In addition, the alternative does not follow the formation rule of the Present Perfect: verb I have flexed in the Simple Present + main verb inflected in Past Participate.

c) CORRECT. The use of Present Perfect in the sentence indicates an action that was recently completed. The word already (already) is commonly used with the Present Perfect to indicate something that happened ahead of schedule.

d) WRONG. The infinitive (represented in the alternative by the form I'm going) is not part of the training structure of the Present Perfect; the main verb must be inflected in the Past Participate: gone.

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